What do you get when you put together 32 world-class photography instructors + 41 of their most essential and invaluable teaching resources?

The Ultimate Photography Bundle, back by popular demand for its second and best year ever!
Here’s the thing: Expert photography instruction isn’t easy to come by, particularly when you’re on a budget.

It can already feel a bit daunting to have the camera, the lenses, the software and everything else you need, but then to think about forking about big bucks on expensive courses and books? Forget about it.

But what if, just for one blissful week, all the resources you’ve had your eye on (and then some) came together in one magical package, for the most affordable price ever? Well, you’re in luck, because that’s exactly what’s happening and I’m telling you, this bundle is AMAZING.

The Ultimate Photography Bundle includes 10 eCourses, 16 eBooks, 4 videos, and 11 practical tools (like editing presets and printable reference cards).

These top-quality resources cover all the topics that matter to the serious photographer… camera essentials, editing, family photography, inspiration & style, landscape, wedding photography, niche photography, and the business of photography.

Altogether, it’s worth a mind-blowing $4100 but you pay just $147. Can you believe it?
With these 41 world-class products you’ll learn how to:
  • find perfect lighting every time
  • consistently pose and shoot pro-quality portraits
  • capture stunning landscapes
  • edit and organize like the experts
  • build a thriving photography business
  • and finally start taking the photos you’ve always dreamed of.
Even better? You’re about to learn from la creme de la creme. I mean, we’re talking about Jeremy Cowart, David Molnar, Zach and Jody Gray, Katelyn James, Click it up a Notch, Cole’s Classroom, Tamara Lackey, and so many more.

So why on earth would these big-name photographers put their very best products into such a discounted package?

Because they’re all passionate about the same thing… coming together to equip, empower and educate a new generation of aspiring photographers and helping them pursue their dreams. By joining forces and doing it together, they can help so many more people than they could on their own!
I am just honored to join such an elite group of photography teachers on this project, and to be able to share it with all of you!

**NOTE: IF YOU WANT TO, THIS IS A GREAT PLACE TO HIGHLIGHT ONE PARTICULAR PRODUCT OF HIGH VALUE OR THAT YOU THINK IS A PERFECT PRODUCT FOR YOUR READERS, AND SHOW HOW JUST THIS ONE PRODUCT IS WORTH GETTING THE ENTIRE BUNDLE FOR.** (If you don’t want to add this in, simply delete this paragraph and use the rest as-is)

There’s just one catch… a deal this good can’t last forever. They all agreed that the bundle would be available for six days only, and then it will disappear.

Which is why you should absolutely learn more and check out everything that’s included, but there’s just one thing you really can’t do and that’s wait. I’d hate for you to miss out on this!

If you’re ready to get your own Ultimate Photography Bundle, go here right now and grab it!

If you’d like to learn more about the specific resources it includes (I don’t think you’ll be disappointed!) then by all means, go here and check it out in detail.

Don’t forget—the bundle goes off sale on Monday, February 27th, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. EST. And if you’re still on the fence, there’s really no risk in getting it anyways because they’ve got a full 30-day happiness guarantee.

What do you get when you put together 32 world-class photography instructors + 41 of their most essential and invaluable teaching resourc...

3 Tricks to Taking Awesome Pictures in the Full Sun

It's Bluebonnet season here in Texas! And they are all over the place. It seems that each year when the bluebonnets blossom everyone is striving to get those perfect pictures in the bluebonnets. I'm not one to pass up a good photo opp so usually every year I hop on the bluebonnet train.

This year the location I picked was apparently spotted by MANY other photographers because when we pulled up there were already at least 2 dozen people in the fields taking pictures. Because I wasn't willing to go trekking around to find another good location I rolled up my sleeves and joined the crowd.

We started taking pictures at around an hour before sunset. Which is usually my favorite time of the day to take pictures but I quickly learned that I was going to have to use some tricks up my sleeve to capture a good picture because a) the sun was brutal in that wide open field and b) there were so many people in the background that I would have to somehow avoid so they didn't show up in our pictures.

Here is a picture I snapped of a few of the people we had to side-step. :) ...


On to the 3 Tricks to Taking Pictures in the open sun...

1) Use back lighting
When you are battling the sun it's never a good idea to place your subject facing the sun because then you are just going to get them squinting. Not to mention the lighting on their face will be way too harsh. So to combat this simply turn their backs toward the sun and use back lighting. (If you are unfamiliar with how to take a back lit picture check out my photography book!)






2) Get creative with how you position your subject
For example, in the 3 pictures below you can see that instead of getting close-ups of my subject I shot them at a distance with the sun to their side. That way the focus is on the entire scene and not on fact that half of their faces and bodies are slightly over exposed with harsh shadows.

Also notice in picture 2 that my focus is on the flowers and not even on the subjects who are blurred in the background.



3) Use yourself at a sunshade
I know of many photographers who bring along assistants to hold shades and reflectors in order to achieve a better photo.  I'm a less-is-more sort of gal who doesn't have time to coordinate with an assistant and who doesn't like to bring along ANY extra gear so I use myself as a shade.

In the pictures below I am having my subjects face the sun and stand in my shadow so the sun isn't directly shining on them. It works nicely to give that even lighting.



You can still achieve great pictures, even in the full sun, you just have to have a few tricks up your sleeve!

And once the sun finally went down, we were able to get a few of these classic bluebonnet shots...

I think I'm going to miss Texas in the Spring...



(NOTE: Want a step-by-step cheat sheet for crisper, colorful and eye catching pictures? Download the Key to Pictures Cheat and stop guessing on your camera’s manual settings.) landing-page

It's Bluebonnet season here in Texas! And they are all over the place. It seems that each year when the bluebonnets blossom everyone is ...

5 Tips for Photographing Newborns




I love taking pictures of newborns. I think it might be my favorite subject to take pictures of. So I jumped at the chance to take some sweet newborn shots of Clara. (Here are some I took of her in the hospital.)

I've thought of 5 things to keep in mind when taking pictures of newborns. Here we go:

Tip 1: Be Calm.
I don't know about you but when I'm shooting a photo session even though I may come off as easy-going with a go-with-the-flow kind of attitude, inside my mind is racing and constantly in "go" mode.  In my opinion, this is really not a big deal...except when it comes to newborns.  I feel like they can sense when things aren't calm and relaxed so in turn it makes them on edge and not willing to relax and fall asleep. So whatever it takes, try and be calm and serene as it will show up in your tiny little subject. Also, when you are calm, Mom will be calm and that is something that affects our little subjects as well.






Tip 2: Keep clothing simple.
I know this really just comes down to someones opinion and taste but I feel like newborns don't need a lot of foof and fluff to make them look adorable. That's why I like to stick with just a simple white onesie or nothing at all. I think it's cute to add a little hat or a special blanket. But it's really not necessary to dress them it their Sunday best quite yet.




Tip 3: Try to work on the baby's time table.
This actually ties in nicely with tip #1 of being calm. One way to also get the baby to look and hold those adorable newborn poses is to not force the baby if they are just not in the mood. It doesn't take much for them to be happy...a full belly, a dry diaper and maybe a swaddle. So I never try and rush a newborn session. If I can see that the baby just isn't being calm or is too fussy I will let Mom take over and do whatever it takes to soothe him/her. Then while Mom is cuddling the baby or tending to him/her I take advantage of some good photo ops of Mom with the baby.






Tip 4: Don't over complicate things.
Just like with the clothing, I try to not go overboard on everything else as well. I like to take pictures of newborns with very little in the frame as not to distract from them. Keeping the setting simple helps to focus the eye on the subject. I love to take pictures of newborns on Mom and Dad's bed and often times I will remove whatever is on their night stands just so it's out of the picture. I try to hide anything that I think will detract from my sweet little subject.



Tip 5: Be Safe!
Always, always, always be safe when you are positioning the baby. I know we've all seen those amazing poses with the baby swaddled in a cloth and is blissfully hanging from a tree branch. Those pictures are truly a piece of art but are not always what they seem. In reality someone actually has a hand underneath the baby to hold him/her and the baby is also only inches off the ground. The photographer does a lot of editing like removing the hand etc. in order to create such shots. Even just putting a newborn on a chair can be potentially dangerous if they all of a sudden flail their arms. So before you try to pose a newborn or put them in/on things, make sure it is first and foremost safe.




(NOTE: Want a step-by-step cheat sheet for crisper, colorful and eye catching pictures? Download the Key to Pictures Cheat and stop guessing on your camera’s manual settings.) landing-page

I love taking pictures of newborns. I think it might be my favorite subject to take pictures of. So I jumped at the chance to take ...

New Developments and Portaits

Hello everyone! Sorry for the bit of silence this week. I have my hands in about 5 different pretty huge photography projects PLUS we are putting our house on the market next week. Phew. But I wanted to show you a few pictures I took today of Lyndon during a video shoot of me teaching how to take pictures.



The settings on all of the pictures: ISO 250, 50mm, f/2.0, shutter speed ranges from 1/1250 to 1/2000.
I positioned Lyndon on the edge of some open shade with him facing the sun.  I did hardly any editing...just a little bit of increased brightness on each picture. 



To actually see the video of me teaching...stay tuned. There are some fun products coming in the near future.






Have a lovely weekend!! I hope everyone has beautiful weather and fun plans. :)



(NOTE: Want a step-by-step cheat sheet for crisper, colorful and eye catching pictures? Download the Key to Pictures Cheat and stop guessing on your camera’s manual settings.) landing-page

Hello everyone! Sorry for the bit of silence this week. I have my hands in about 5 different pretty huge photography projects PLUS we are pu...

5 Tips to take beautiful newborn pictures in the hospital




There are few things more precious than a newborn, especially a newborn who is just hours old. I'm always in awe of the absolute miracle of it all. As a photographer, I can't help but think how every single detail needs to be documented.

Here are 5 Tips to take beautiful newborn pictures while they are still in the hospital:

#1: Open all the blinds and use a low aperture. 

Often times hospital rooms are not exactly conducive to taking natural light photos. But not to worry, there is always a way around it. First of all open the blinds (pull them all the way up, don't just open the slats). Next, if you still don't have a fast enough shutter speed, dial your aperture all the way down. (f/1.8, 2.0, 2.2 etc.) This will hwlp you achieve a nice and fast shutter speed.




#2: Position the baby where there is not a lot of clutter and distraction.

Let's face it, hospital rooms are packed with eye clutter...cords, trays, buttons, your own stuff, the baby's stuff...the list goes on and on. When taking pictures of the baby push that clutter aside and fill your frame with the baby.
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#3: Take some detail shots of the baby and the room.

A newborn's skin is so soft and furry and often times so wrinkly. And unfortunately this stage only lasts for such a brief moment. Take some close-up pictures of the baby and even some of the surrounding area to document exactly what the baby looks like.
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#4: Step back and take a picture of the entire room.

Just as you took pictures of the details, take some pull-back pictures of the entire room to show what it felt like and looked like in the hospital room.
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#5: Take some pictures with the baby and Mom.

Of course you need to document Mom holding the baby and the special bond they share. To help take the pressure of being in front of the camera off of Mom try suggesting things for her to do. For example say, "Hold the baby in your left arm and gaze down at the baby." (click, click, click) or "Put the baby on your belly and look up at the camera." (click, click, click) "Good, okay now look down at the baby. " (click, click, click)
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There you go! Above all, relax and have fun! I know that when you are in the thick of trying to capture the perfect photo it can get stressful or even frustrating. But I assure you, as you stop, take a deep breath and just relax into it, you will find success. 


(NOTE: Want a step-by-step cheat sheet for crisper, colorful and eye catching pictures? Download the Key to Pictures Cheat and stop guessing on your camera’s manual settings.) landing-page

There are few things more precious than a newborn, especially a newborn who is just hours old. I'm always in awe of the absolute ...