Day 5 - Christmas Photo Countdown

12:21 AM Katie Evans 3 Comments

Day 5: Gingerbread houses
Photo Info:
50mm, ISO 500, f/2.0, 1/50th sec.

Photo Tip:
I've gotten some great questions from several of you about how to take certain pictures or how achieve a particular effect. And many of you are interested in how to take pictures indoors, without a flash. SO here are some tips on taking indoor pictures...

1- turn off all of the overhead lights as it will make for a funky color situation. Only rely on light coming from the windows. see examples below.
photo taken with the overhead light on causing an orange hue.

The lights were turned off using only the light coming in from the window behind me.

2- If it's nighttime, there are no windows or it's just plain cloudy and dreary outside then of course keep the overhead lights on but make sure your white balance is set on incandescent or fluorescent lighting. Or if you use a manual white balance put the number very low such as 2700K.

3- Use a lens with a very low aperture (f/1.4, 1.8 ...) in order to let in as much as possible.

4- If needed, (as in you are not getting a fast enough shutter speed even though your aperture is very low) start to increase your ISO until you gain a sufficient shutter speed.

5- If all else fails, try to hold VERY STILL while you take the picture to reduce camera shake causing blurriness.

And a few more pics just to finish it off!
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Day 5: Gingerbread houses Photo Info: 50mm, ISO 500, f/2.0, 1/50th sec. Photo Tip: I've gotten some great questions from several of ...

3 comments:

SaigeWisdom said...

I can't believe how organized your candy is! what a great idea... bravo.

I can't take credit for the candy organization tackle box. It was my friend, Gina who gets the credit for this one! And yes, what a great idea!

angelq said...

Using the continuous shoot setting on my camera has been a big help in low light situations that require a higher shutter speed. Usually the first shot is blurry but the next shots will have more clarity.